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Kingsley, John

Male 1614 - 1678  (63 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Kingsley, John 
    Born 7 Sep 1614  Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Jan 1677/78  Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I45932  Bob Juch's Kin
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2019 

    Family 1 Daniels, Alice,   b. 1608, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jan 1672/73, Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years) 
    Married 1656  Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2019 
    Family ID F15403  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Stoughton, Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1610, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1642  (Age ~ 31 years) 
    Married 1635  2nd Church of Dorchester Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Kingsley, Freedom,   b. Abt 1636, Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 1689, Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 53 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2019 
    Family ID F15404  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Johnson, Mary,   b. 1608, Great Amwell, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jan 1677/78, Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 16 Mar 1673/74  Rehoboth, Bristol, MA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2019 
    Family ID F15405  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 7 Sep 1614 - Hampshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 1656 - Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 6 Jan 1677/78 - Rehoboth, Bristol, Massachusetts, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Known as "Kingsley Lore", the origin of the family and the surname Kingsley started when William the Conqueror, the Norman King of England was succeeded by his third son, William the Second also known as "Rufus the Red King" who ruled England between 1087-1100 AD. Early in his reign he suffered a revolt of his Barons. Tradition says he went hunting in New Forest or Vale Royal one day and became separated from his companions and attendants. He became lost and wandered aimlessly through the forest and glades. Towards the eve of night he saw a light beaming from a forester's cabin. He approached the cabin and, without making himself known to the forester, the forester offered him a night's shelter. The forester byname of Ranulphus slaughtered a young goat and his wife prepared a savory meal. The King was refreshed by the evening meal and was offered a humble couch in which he slept that night, and in the morning partook of another bounteous repast. In the bright of day he discovered he was in his own lea. He was so delighted with the forester's hospitality that he bestowed the whole of that portion of his domain known as the King's lea, "Kyngesleigh". The forester became known as Sir Ranulphus de Kyngesleigh. Later the family crest contained a Baron's Crown surmounted by a goat's head. Some drawings and descriptions of the coat of arms can be seen in the book, "Kingsley Family of America" by William Arthur Kingsley. The following notes courtesy of Peter Blackwell, posted on Kingsley GenForum 2/16/00 at http://genfor um.genealogy.com/kingsley/messages/246.html: Among the people who came to Plymouth in 1630 were two brothers, John and Stephen Kingsley, who came from Hampshire, England. In 1635, John Kingsley left Plymouth and moved north to Dorchester in the developing Boston area with a friend of Cotton Mather. He was followed by Stephen who by 1640 was the owner of a valuable property in the Braintree area. There he became a Court Deputy in Braintree and Milton from 1650 to 1666 and was also trustee of estates until his death in 1673. His family was to go on to found several towns in the Connecticut area. John, along with seven others was a pillar of a new church founded on August 23, 1636 and was among the last survivors. John Kingsley acquired the first grant of land in Taunton, MA area in 1645 and relocated there. The next year he became a shareholder in Great Lots (?). Three years later he moved to Rehoboth in Bristol County, MA. The area around Rehoboth would eventually witness "King Philip's War". The first generation of settlers who had worked out an uneasy alliance with Massasoit, chief of the Wampanoag Indians, were now replaced by people who wanted to expand their opportunities for development. The culture of the Indians differed greatly to that of the settlers in regards to the use of the land. A continuing problem was the trampling of Native cornfields by the colonists' livestock. While the colonists were legally responsible for the damage, such laws were difficult to enforce in remote areas such as Rehoboth and Taunton. Increased competition for these resources of land for planting, hunting and fishing caused much friction between the two groups. In 1662, in an arrogant attempt to exert control, the Plymouth Court summoned Wampanoag leader, Wamsutta, son of Massasoit, to Plymouth. Major Josiah Winslow, with a small force of men, took Wamsutta at gunpoint. Soon after questioning, Wamsutta became ill and died. His death greatly angered the Wampanoag. Wamsutta's brother, Metacom (also called Philip) succeeded him. Plymouth's continued unyielding policy toward Native leaders, as well as the events surrounding the murder of Sassamon, a liaison between the two groups, caused the breakdown in relations that led to war. In 1675, hostilities broke out in the town of Swansea, and the war spread as far north as New Hampshire, and as far southwest as Connecticut. Not all the native peoples, however, sided with Philip. Most natives who had converted to Christianity fought with the English or remained neutral. The English, however, did not always trust these converts and interned many of them in camps or outlying islands. Native soldiers fighting on the side of the colonists helped turn the tide of the war, which ended in 1676 when Philip was killed by a Wampanoag fighting with Captain Benjamin Church in the Great Swamp of southern Rhode Island. The strain connected with the difficult relationships with the Indians over almost a thirty year period ending with the death of Philip caused John's health to suffer and he asked for relief in that year. He moved to Bristol, Rhode Island and died in 1678.

  • Sources 
    1. [S1137] World Family Tree Vol. 4, Ed. 1, Broderbund Software, Inc., (Name: Release date: August 23, 1996;), Tree #2475.

    2. [S1202] World Family Tree Vol. 11, Ed. 1, Broderbund Software, Inc., (Name: Release date: July 1, 1997;), Tree #1599.