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de Mowbray, 3rd Duke of Norfolk John

Male 1415 - 1461  (46 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name de Mowbray, John 
    Title 3rd Duke of Norfolk 
    Born 12 Sep 1415 
    Gender Male 
    Died 6 Nov 1461 
    Person ID I41479  Bob Juch's Kin
    Last Modified 8 Jan 2018 

    Father de Mowbray, John,   b. 1392,   d. 19 Oct 1432, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother de Neville, Katherine,   b. 1398, Raby Castle, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1483, Epworth, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 86 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 12 Jan 1411  Raby, Durham, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F15277  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Bourchier, Eleanor 
    Children 
     1. de Mowbray, John,   b. 18 Oct 1444,   d. 14 Jan 1476  (Age 31 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 8 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F13915  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • At the beginning of the War of the Roses in 1450 he supported Richard, Duke of York, the leader of the Yorkist faction. However, in 1459, he swore allegiance to the Lancastrian Henry VI. He then quickly changed sides back to the Yorkists. This sort of treachery was by no means unusual during the Wars of the Roses. In February 1461 he fought for the defeated Yorkists in the Second Battle of St Albans. In March 1461 (Richard, Duke of York now being dead) he was one of those who asked the Duke’s son the Earl of March to become Edward IV and later that month his intervention at the Battle of Towton was decisive. The battle took place in a snow storm between 80,000 men. Neither side could get an advantage until about midday Norfolk entered the battle on the Yorkist’s right flank. The Lancastrians then began to slowly fall back. As Earl Marshal Mowbray then officiated at Edward IV’s coronation. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia